Blog - Page 10
by Brooke Patterson

1. “Early rehabilitation goals – the one leg rise test”: Early patellofemoral osteoarthritis features 1 year after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction predict symptoms and quality of life at 3 years (Culvenor, et al. 2015) Why I like it: Predictability, early identification. This study outlines features that we can be aware of early following ACLR that can predict those with worsening symptoms…read more

by Matt King

What is FAI? FAI is caused by a bony growth abnormality of either the femur (thigh bone) called a CAM, acetabulum (socket) called a pincer or both. These abnormalities often cause an abutment of the hip joint during certain movements, namely flexion and rotation, resulting in a pinching sensation at the hip or pain; most…read more

by Jade Tan

What is knee cap osteoarthritis? Knee cap osteoarthritis or patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (PFJ OA) as it is known to medical professionals, is a condition which causes pain and stiffness in and around the front of the knee. It is the most common knee joint osteoarthritis. Knee cap osteoarthritis occurs during daily activities such as walking,…read more

by Dr Christian Barton (Editor)

“I don’t see myself having to need knee surgery for a very long time. I don’t think I would have ever needed surgery in the first place if it could have been managed prior with a proper exercise regime” At the age of 31, Rhys had given up on living an active life. He had undergone ten surgeries…read more

by Dr Ebonie Rio

By Dr Ebonie Rio Key points Many structures can drive pain that is felt at the front of the knee Differentiation of where the pain is (localised versus vague) appears to be associated with different changes to muscle drive / excitability Anterior knee pain (pain at the front of the knee) can be caused by…read more

by Prof Jill Cook

By Professor Jill Cook. Rest completely The old adage of use it or lose it applies to tendons, resting just decreases the ability of the tendon to take load. It also affects the muscle attached to the tendon and the rest of the leg, leaving the person with less ability to load the tendon. Conversely…read more