Blog - TREK - Page 2
by Dr Christian Barton (Editor)

“Having an ACL reconstruction does not mean you automatically go back to playing sport” – Dr Clare Adern, September 2016. In the lead up to the 2016 Sports Medicine Australia Conference at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in October, I had the pleasure of speaking to Dr Clare Ardern, a Post-Doctoral Researcher from Linköping University in Sweden. She…read more

by Dr Christian Barton (Editor)

“A lot of common exercises don’t provide the level of activity we think we would need for muscle hypertrophy.” – Adam Semciw (University of Queensland) 26.8.16. More than 100 people turned out to La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre’s Hip and Groin Symposium on Friday August 26. I had the pleasure of speaking to…read more

by Dr Christian Barton (Editor)

An early morning Jetstar flight to Launceston to hear Tasmanian PhD candidate and podiatrist Narelle Wyndow at the Tasmanian State Podiatry Symposium was well worth it. “The patellofemoral joint (knee cap) is the most common form of knee osteoarthritis” says Wyndow. 69% of people with knee pain over the age of 40 will have knee cap…read more

by Brooke Patterson

We know that development of osteoarthritis (OA) after ACL reconstruction occurs in over 50% of patients. The question is, should we inform our patients of this, and if so how should we go about this. Anecdotally, consensus is that this can be a tricky conversation, and something that may be avoided by some therapists due…read more

by Dr Christian Barton (Editor)

The patellofemoral pain research community met in July 2015 to present recent research findings and discuss the current state of the evidence. The meeting resulted in six key recommendations, based on evidence published between January 2010 and June 2015, and voting by those attending the meeting:   Exercise therapy 1) Exercise is recommended to reduce…read more

by Dr Christian Barton (Editor)

Historically, academic journals have been the primary medium for translation of research evidence to medical professionals. This dependence on one source for information may be the key reason for ineffective research evidence translation. To publish research evidence in an academic journal, a researcher is required to: Write their findings into a report Have this report…read more